4 Books Entrepreneur Turned Venture Capitalist Ben Horowitz Recommends

4 Books Entrepreneur Turned Venture Capitalist Ben Horowitz Recommends

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As an entrepreneur and business owner, filling knowledge gaps is an absolute necessity to get ahead of the game.

And someone who has consistently been ahead of the game is Ben Horowitz of Andreessen Horowitz. He co-founded and served as president and CEO of the company Opsware, which Hewlett-Packard acquired for $1.6 billion in cash in July 2007. He's also author of The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers.

In a recent live chat on ProductHunt, Horowitz shared some of his favourite books.

1. High Output Management by Andy Grove

Often labeled as the "bible for startup management" - Grove's expertise and knowledge in the world of management is timeless. It integrates both of production and management models that can be applied to any business model and activity.

Andy Grove's classic 1983 tome High Output Management integrates both the production (factory) and management (people) models essential to any business activity, no matter how "ethereal".

2. Fooled by Randomness by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Taleb is a professional trader and mathematics professor and in this book he examines what randomness means in business and in life and why human beings are so prone to mistake dumb luck for consummate skill.

3. The Black Jacobins by C.L.R. James

This powerful book is the definitive account of the Haitian Revolution of 1794-1803, a revolution that began in the wake of the Bastille but became the model for the Third World liberation movements from Africa to Cuba.

This book shares the story of the French colony of San Domingo, and how one slave led the black people of San Domingo in a successful struggle against invasions – which helped form the first independent nation in the Caribbean.

4. Tuff: A Novel by Paul Beatty

As fast-paced and hard-edged as the Harlem streets it portrays, Tuff shows off all of the amazing skill that Paul Beatty showed off in his first novel, The White Boy Shuffle.

At 300 pounds, Tuff is a true heavyweight in his East Harlem neighborhood. He robs, he kills, he gets high. But by the end of Tuff, he is as complexly drawn, as funny, and as lovable as any character. Beatty torques his man into an uncomfortable position: this mighty rose in Spanish Harlem decides to run for City Council.

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